JazzUSA.Com – November 2000

JazzUsa.com
by Raymond Redmond

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

 

 

This second album from bassist Joseph Patrick Moore is good. Not superior, but solid. The first song Datz It starts out a little weak, but by the end it is full and jumping. Then comes Ashes to Ashes and you begin to think there may be something here. The keyboard work of Bill Anschell and Vance Thompson’s horn work shine here, as they do throughout the CD, and Jimmy Herring plays a wicked guitar solo in the middle.

After Big Butt Bass, a 27 second song/solo by Moore on his bass, comes the title tune. Perhaps there is a melodic harmonic intent here, but it gets by me. I found the song to be interesting but pretty atonal. It has some great horn work in it, but it would not be my choice for a title tune. After another interlude, this one a 1-1/2 minute drum-centric piece dedicated to Tony Williams, Moore comes back strong and funky on Mumphis Cosanostra. Sort of retro, this is one of the better songs on the CD, and it again features strong horn lines and some groovin keyboard lines by Anschell.

The bass throughout the album is strong and rhythmic, Moore definitely has his own style. Cosmic Dance is even more retro with it’s Chicago-esque horn lines and hammond-ish keyboards. Goin’ to California is the obligatory ‘this is my album and I’m gonna do a mostly solo song to show off my chops’ song. Stanley Clarke does it all the time, and Moore is good enough to pull it off. The CD ends up with a lively rendition of the classic pop tune Dust in the Wind, which has more of those odd harmonies that bothered me on the title track. There is also a hiddentrack at the ten minutes mark o f ‘Dust’ (which fades after three minutes or so). It’s a rainy day kind of thing that is better than some of the noted songs on the CD.

With Soul Cloud, Joseph Patrick Moore has brought together some good musicians and put together a release that is a step up into the big time. A little more polish here and there, less of that odd harmony and Joseph Patrick Moore will be a major player in the Jazz world.

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